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Left: Oct. 29, 2010 - TerraGroup Corporation's President Primo L. Acernese speaks about the success of the LWPS during a visit from PA Representative Jennifer L. Mann and US Congressman Charlie Dent.

Right: March 16, 2012 - Completed LWPS system modules at the TECWAR SYSTEMS manufacturing facility.

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TECWAR® TACTICAL WATER PURIFICATION SYSTEMS APPROVED BY STATE OF VA FOR TREATING TACTICAL WATER PURIFICATION WASTE STREAMS AT THE FORSCOM LOGISTICS TRAINING SITE – SALTWATER ANNEX LOCATED AT FT. STORY, VA.

printable version

Multi-Functional Modular Fluid Filtration System (MMFFS™) treats Reverse Osmosis Water Purification Unit (ROWPU) Waste Streams at base 6.2 miles from Virginia Beach.

ALLENTOWN, PA - TerraGroup Corporation, designer and manufacturer of TECWAR® Tactical Water Purification Systems, has received approval for its tactical wastewater treatment system from the state of Virginia to treat wastewater generated by military water purification training operations at FT. Story, Virginia.

When most people are thirsty, they go to their sink or reach for a bottle to quench their thirst. When the US Military gets thirsty, it goes to the nearest river, lake or ocean for a drink. On the battlefield, Military operations need supplies and there is nothing more important than keeping soldiers supplied with purified water. The Military accomplishes this by using specially designed and constructed mobile Reverse Osmosis Water Purification Units (ROWPU). These “mobile water purifiers” can go almost anywhere and produce potable water from almost any source.

Soldiers who operate and maintain the ROWPUs, and who distribute water to the soldiers in the field, train initially at FT. Lee, Virginia, and receive enhanced military occupational skills training at FT. Story, Virginia. An additional “tactical scenario” training site is also planned for FT Pickett, Virginia. Because the ROWPU must get close to the source water, the training is performed in environmentally sensitive areas: ocean beach, lake, river, or stream side. Through the course of learning ROWPU operation and maintenance procedures, wastewater is generated through backwashing multi-media filters and cleaning of the reverse osmosis membrane elements. Product water (raw water that has been purified) must also be treated before discharging because of high levels of chlorine that is added to prevent recontamination by various types of microorganisms.

These “tactical wastewaters” would normally have to be hauled out by tanker truck to a state approved location for discharge, usually to a wastewater treatment plant. This is not a cost effective or asset efficient solution. By utilizing the MMFFS™ to treat the wastewater on site, a substantial cost savings is realized and there is no need to utilize other assets for back hauling the wastewater.

With this important development, soldiers can now train on ROWPU operations and maintenance procedures while maintaining a high state of readiness and preparedness and preserving high level of environmental stewardship with no adverse environmental impact.

ABOUT THE MMFFS™

The MMFFS™ is a tactical water treatment and purification system designed by TerraGroup Corporation. The system was designed to fit in a standard M105 US Army trailer and is towable by 2.5 or 5 ton truck. It’s totally self-contained, needing only diesel fuel or gasoline, depending on the model. It can be operational in 30 minutes and is operated and maintained by one person with no special tools and minimal instruction. The MMFFS™ can be configured for different flow rates and flow patterns from 50 gallons per minute (GPM) to 150 GPM. The capabilities of the MMFFS™ include treating ROWPU wastewater streams, pre-treating NBC contaminated water to protect downstream components and equipment; decontamination runoff resulting from mass causality incidents, highly chlorinated water, grey water from showers and laundry systems and water that has been contaminated with POL (petroleum-oils-lubricants). Major components of the MMFFS™ can be recycled and be reconstituted and returned to service with little or no waste. The MMFFS™ is protected by 3 US patents and trademarks.

ABOUT TERRAGROUP CORPORATION

TerraGroup Corporation has focused entirely on the design, engineering and manufacturing of patented water purification systems and water storage and distribution products that specifically address military field applications, potable water for disasters, emergency water supply and NBC decontamination. All of the TECWAR® systems are highly mobile, self-contained, modular and scalable. They are designed for rapid response, remote locations and expeditionary teams.

Headquartered in Allentown, Pennsylvania the company continues its work in improving and developing water purification products for military field applications, environmental defense, homeland security and disaster relief. For more information on TECWAR® Tactical Water Purification Systems, send email inquiry to tecwar@tacticalwater.com.

download press release

 


USSOCOM Conference & Exhibition

All conference presentations in Acrobat .pdf format

Capture; Contain; Treat and Dispose of Decontamination
Runoff On-Site

12/8/2005

Responding to the terrorist CBRN threat: ""Preparation or Panic"" is this years CBRN conference theme. The conference and exhibition will focus on synchronizing nation-wide CBRN defense efforts in order to create a unity of effort in combating terrorist CBRN threats. CBRN defense preparations are difficult, man-power intensive, and expensive.

Mr. Primo L. Acernese, President/CEO of TerraGroup Corp. will discuss the problems of dealing with large amounts of contaminated runoff during a mass casualty incident involving a CBRN attack. There is no overwhelming indication of a successful program where there are thousands of victims and serious environmental impacts. USSOCOM seeks to bring together members of the CBRN defense community to share information concerning ongoing and future efforts in order to gain a synergy and unity of CBRN defense effort. We all must plan together, develop smart and efficient strategies for providing the warfighter with the tools he or she needs to defeat the threat, and be prepared to make the tough decisions about what we really need, versus what we might like.

If you need further information about this event, click here for the NDIA USSOCOM agenda and registration page.

PRO™ 3000

PRO™ 3000

PRO™ 3000

PRO™ 3000


TECWAR® TACTICAL WATER PURIFICATION SYSTEMS USED BY US AIR FORCE TO PROVIDE WATER FOR THE LAST MISSION OF US ARMY’S ONLY REMAINING MASH UNIT. printable version

Portable Reverse Osmosis (PRO™) SYSTEM 3000 Provided Purified Water for MEDFLAG 2005: A Military exercise jointly conducted by the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the REPUBLIC OF ANGOLA.

ALLENTOWN, PA - The last Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH) in the United States Army had recently pitched its tents in Angola, Africa for exercise MEDFLAG 2005. Task Force Angola’s MEDFLAG 2005 objectives were to install a large water pump in the town of Ambriz that would effectively double the town’s water supply, establish and certify a hospital, delivering the first Humanitarian Assistance Program and provide crisis-response training with Angolan military members.

Included in the 212th MASH Unit’s support team was the U.S. Air Force’s 86th Contingency Response Group which kept the entire camp’s water running throughout the whole exercise. The 86th CRG provided drinking; shower and laundry water for the task force by purifying the local sea water using the TECWAR® PRO™ 3000 Portable Reverse Osmosis Tactical Water Purification System. 

The difficult terrain and the logistical layout proved little challenge to the waterdawgs of the 86th CRG who were able to adapt and maximize the specific and unique capabilities of the TECWAR® PROTM System. Their expertise enabled them to produce thousands of gallons of potable water from the ocean. The reason such a large amount of water was produced from sea water was because in addition to potable supplies, the purified water was also used to support laundry and showers for the base camp.  The sea water processed through TerraGroup’s PROTM 3000 Unit was tested and in compliance with the drinking water standards listed in the US Military’s water regulation: TB MED 577.

The PROTM 3000’s lightweight design, extremely versatile operational footprint and performance, once again demonstrated its value as the ultimate lightweight water purifier in the tactical class, and providing troops the confidence that high-quality water for drinking, shower, and laundry purposes can be produced from any water source anywhere in the world.

ABOUT THE PRO 3000™

The PRO 3000TM is a tactical water treatment and purification system designed by TerraGroup Corporation. It provides absolute water purification for any field condition and was developed for early entry units, highly mobile teams and remote sites. The system was designed for transportation in a standard military M1097A series HMMWV; UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter; and C-130 Air Transport. The basic system can even be mounted on a John Deere Military Gator. With no requirement for external power, (generators or electricity) it is totally self-contained needing only diesel fuel or gasoline, depending on the model.  It can be operational in less than 60 minutes and can be operated and maintained by one person with no special tools and minimal instruction. Basic system weight is less than 1,250 lbs. and its versatile footprint allows 300 ft. “source to storage” or “tailgate” configuration (and anything in between). The PROTM 3000 flow rates range from 300 Gallons Per Hour (GPH) on freshwater water sources to 180 GPH on sea water. The PROTM is effective in producing potable water from chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) contaminated sources and is designed to operate in hostile environments. The PROTM 3000 Tactical Water Purification System is protected by 3 US Patents and Trademarks.

ABOUT TERRAGROUP CORPORATION

TerraGroup Corporation has focused entirely on the design, engineering and manufacturing of patented water purification systems including water storage and distribution products that specifically address military field applications, potable water for disasters, emergency water supply and NBC decontamination. All of the TECWAR® systems are highly mobile, self-contained, modular and scalable. They are designed for rapid response, remote locations and expeditionary teams. 

Headquartered in Allentown, Pennsylvania, the company continues its work in improving and developing water purification products for military field applications, environmental defense, homeland security and disaster relief.

download press release

Read the article about the PRO™ featured in ARNEWS ARMY NEWS SERVICE

ARNEWS
212th MASH lending medical support in Angola

By Karen Parrish
AMBRIZ, Angola (Army News Service, Sept. 13, 2005)

Air Force Link to view photo gallery - see photo in left column, second row down from top, with description

Air Force Link to view the photo from the 212th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital

 

 

Senior leaders visit Corps’ first experimental FOB 3/18/2010

 

Wednesday, February 03, 2010

New Water Purification System for GI's

1st Marine Logistic Group Public Affairs  Story by Lance Cpl. Khoa Pelczar

02.02.2010  MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – As Marines conduct combat operations overseas, they will need water to carry on the mission.

Hygiene equipment operators with 1st Marine Logistics Group trained and familiarized themselves with a new and improved water purification system here, Jan. 27.

"The purpose of this training is to introduce a brand new piece of equipment into the Marine Corps," said Gunnery Sgt. Jason J. Parrish, project officer for Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va. "This Lightweight Water Purification System will be replacing the legacy system 3,000 Lightweight Military Tactical Water Purification System."

According to Parrish, 36, from Pittsboro, Ind., the old system can only purify
fresh water, as opposed to the new system, which can purify any kind of water.

"It met or exceeded all requirements that were given, it went above and beyond," said Parrish. "A two-man team can unpack, set up and have the system operating in 15 minutes."

All week long, Marines were able to work with this new water purification system as this model will be going to Afghanistan with deploying Marines.

"The concept is that since it's easy to be moved around, it can be set-up in the back of a Humvee and go on a [combat logistics patrol] with the Marines," said Parrish. "This way, Marines can push forward with the mission and [they] don't have to be waiting on supplies. It fills the capability gap that has been in the Marine Corps forever."

The system was designed by Primo L. Acernese, developer with the Terra Group Corporation.

"As a young engineer I worked in the desert, so I learned to appreciate the value of water," said Acernese, from Allentown, Pa., developer of the LWPS. "Because water is very important, I've been working on this project for 14 years. My goal was to develop a system that is simple to operate and easy to move around and maintain."

The new water purification system will improve deploying Marines movement ability in a combat logistics patrol and provide water for Marines at forward operating base, therefore it will help Marines accomplish their missions.

Posted by MsMarti - on Wednesday, February 03, 2010 at 22:30 in Afghanistan News


Sgt. Carlos I. Salazar, 21, from Houston, hygiene equipment operator of Combat Logistics 5, Combat Logistics Regiment 1, 1st Marine Logistics Group, tests a Lightweight Water Purification System at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Jan. 27. The new water purification system allows Marines to purify water on the go as it weighs one-fourth of the old system.

Lance Cpl. Jose R. Sebastian, 22, from Queens, N.Y., hygiene equipment operator with Combat Logistics Battalion 5, Combat Logistics Regiment 1, 1st Marine Logistics Group, tests a Lightweight Water Purification System at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Jan. 27. The new water purification system allows Marines to purify water on the go as it weighs one-fourth of the old system.

Cpl. Jason R. Garris-Obrien (left), 22, from Houston, Lance Cpl. Jose R. Sebastian (middle), 22, from Queens, N.Y., and Sgt. Carlos I. Salazar (right), 21, from Houston, hygiene equipment operators with 1st Marine Logistics Group, test a Lightweight Water Purification System at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Jan. 27. The new water purification system allows Marines to purify water on the go as it weighs one-fourth as much as the old system.


Senior leaders visit Corps’ first experimental FOB 

3/18/2010  By Cpl. Priscilla Sneden, Headquarters Marine Corps 

General James T. Conway, commandant of the Marine Corps, toured a technical demonstration where more than two dozen commercial vendors showcased the first Experimental Forward Operating Base March 12.

ExFOB is a four-phase experiment which tests methods to reduce the logistical needs of combat units in a deployed environment. Created by the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, its ecological and cost benefits are in line with Conway's objective to reduce expenditure and extend a unit's sustainability.

"The commandant has made it very clear that his thoughts are to decrease risk to Marines. In order to do that we have to come up with solutions that reduce our demand on water and power," said Brig. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund, the warfighting lab commanding general. "Hopefully, we can achieve this with some of the solutions offered during the ExFOB."

Reducing resupply needs will alleviate the amount of trucks on the road and Marines exposed to improvised explosive devices and other dangers.

"Energy conservation is important to the Marine Corps because it saves lives. We're losing Marines over water and fuel," said Gunnery Sgt. Jason Parrish, project officer, Marine Corps Systems Command. "If we could bridge that gap we can mitigate [the amount of personnel and vehicles] on the road."

The Corps is seeking energy efficient solutions that are user-friendly and rugged enough to sustain transportation and avoid any additional burdens on a deploying unit.

Phase one of the experiment simulated the energy and water demands of a Marine unit at forward operating bases similar to those in Afghanistan. The initial phase determined the baseline requirements of company-size and smaller FOBs.

Hedelund said the project is currently in phase two, evaluating existing commercial technologies to meet the Marines' needs and increasing power generation efficiency to sustain a small base.

Next, a unit preparing to deploy will use the renewable technology and energy-saving techniques learned in the initial phases.

"Phase three will be the end user evaluation. Equipment will be sent to Afghanistan to see how well it fares in a combat environment," Hedelund said.

The fourth and final phase will facilitate future science and technology efforts by gathering data on experimental systems.

Subject matter experts and Marines from the operational forces will evaluate and assess systems to determine which are beneficial to the Marine Corps.

"[The commandant] has applied a lot of energy to this. He is making sure [the assessment teams] stay focused with a sense of urgency to get this [technology] down range," Hedelund said.

Hedelund also said some of the items on display are currently being used in Afghanistan, while various "green" solutions are anticipated to reach the region this summer.

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va.-Vendors at the first Experimental  Forward Operating Base brief Gen. James T. Conway, commandant of the  Marine Corps, on possible energy efficient solutions as he tours the  technical demonstration March 12, 2010.  Created by the Marine Corps  Warfighting Laboratory, ExFOB is a four-phase experiment that tests  methods to reduce the logistical needs of combat units in a deployed  environment. The Corps is seeking energy efficient solutions that are  user-friendly and rugged enough to sustain transportation and avoid an  additional burden on a deploying unit. , <b>Cpl. Priscilla Sneden,  3/12/2010 5:23 AM</b>

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va.-Vendors at the first Experimental Forward Operating Base brief Gen. James T. Conway, commandant of the Marine Corps, on possible energy efficient solutions as he tours the technical demonstration March 12, 2010. Created by the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, ExFOB is a four-phase experiment that tests methods to reduce the logistical needs of combat units in a deployed environment. The Corps is seeking energy efficient solutions that are user-friendly and rugged enough to sustain transportation and avoid an additional burden on a deploying unit. , Cpl. Priscilla Sneden, 3/12/2010 5:23 AM

Marines Take Steps to Avoid Costly Bottled Water Resupply, entire article May 2011

Changing the flow of downrange water 7/16/2011

Excerpts from

Marines Take Steps to Avoid Costly Bottled Water Resupply

May 2011

By Fred C. Lash

A Defense Department study shows the cost of delivering bottled water to troops in Afghanistan to be $4.69 per gallon. With a daily water demand of 5.2 gallons per marine per day (the amount for all uses), just supplying water to approximately 20,000 troops costs nearly $500,000 a day.


….the cost of delivering bottled water to the troops is rapidly becoming unsustainable. Bottles create large amounts of litter and are far more expensive than the water provided by military purification units. Bottles also have created a security problem in Afghanistan. The convoys needed to truck in bottled water are vulnerable to improvised explosive devices, which pose great risks to convoy personnel.


“We are encouraging commanders to use the LWPS and TWPS. Every time you have to move large amounts of bottled water, we put our marines at risk.”


Col. Robert J. Charette Jr.,
head of the commandant’s
expeditionary energy office


“Water guys don’t drink bottled water. They drink the water that comes out of our systems
(LWPS), because it’s better than bottled water.”


Gunnery Sgt. Jason Parrish


“Hauling water makes up 51 percent of the logistical burden,” Moore said. His team calculated that a gallon of water at the tactical edge in Afghanistan costs the military $4.78, compared to the assured delivery price of $1.42 per gallon. “The Marine Corps should be focusing on finding solutions at the tactical edge,” said Moore, including using indigenous sources of water wherever possible and making investments in more water-efficient technologies at forward operating
bases.

Col. T.C. Moore is the Marine Corps’
operational liaison to the
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency


Entire article from

Marines Take Steps to Avoid Costly Bottled Water Resupply 

May 2011 

By Fred C. Lash 

 

Potable water supplies are a vital resource on any battlefield. To meet the demand in current wars, the U.S. military purchases huge quantities of commercially bottled water in addition to equipping and using organic water purification units.  

Bottled water has become the preferred option among deployed troops. Within Marine Corps units, it is seen as more convenient and seems to taste better than purified water. Marines are more confident of its quality because each bottle is sealed.

But the cost of delivering bottled water to the troops is rapidly becoming unsustainable. Bottles create large amounts of litter and are far more expensive than the water provided by military purification units. Bottles also have created a security problem in Afghanistan. The convoys needed to truck in bottled water are vulnerable to improvised explosive devices, which pose great risks to convoy personnel.  

Raw water sources are available in the Helmand River basin in Afghanistan. But these water sources have both chemical and microbiological contaminants and require treatment before use. Because of the economic costs and risks to life of providing bottled water, the Marine Corps is looking at technology alternatives that can be used to treat indigenous raw water.

Forward operating bases depend heavily on convoys to supply their basic needs. It’s not unusual for a base to be located in an area with no potable water. In these cases, trucks are likely needed to haul in vast quantities of fresh water on a regular basis. According to the Marine Corps Survival Manual, each individual in the field in Afghanistan needs to consume at least 2.6 gallons of water per day in order to remain healthy.

A Defense Department study shows the cost of delivering bottled water to troops in Afghanistan to be $4.69 per gallon. With a daily water demand of 5.2 gallons per marine per day (the amount for all uses), just supplying water to approximately 20,000 troops costs nearly $500,000 a day.

In the southern basin, the Helmand River represents 40 percent of Afghanistan’s surface water and is the main source.

Afghanistan relies on groundwater, which represents the most consistent water source in both rural and urban areas. But a geological study said that 65 percent of protected, closed wells and 90 percent of open wells — the most common drinking water source in many areas — are contaminated with coliform bacteria.

More than 80 percent of Afghanistan’s water resources originate in the Hindu Kush Mountains. The snow accumulates in the winter and melts in the spring. Water pollution from raw sewage is the most significant environmental problem and health threat to deployed personnel. Nationwide, water sources are contaminated with harmful bacteria such as E. Coli and Leptospira.

There is equipment available that can purify both freshwater and saltwater. Marines, however, do not have their own well drilling capability.

Company-sized water purification systems are en route to Afghanistan, where larger-scale systems are also getting more use on remote battlefields.

Two key systems are now being employed by the Marine Corps and the Army that will let them transform any water — even salty seawater — into something that’s safe to drink.

The Lightweight Water Purification System, or the LWPS, fits in a Humvee and can produce up to 125 gallons of potable water per hour.  The other method for purifying water is the Tactical Water Purification System (TWPS).  It filters and cleans 1,200 to 1,500 gallons of water an hour, enabling a utilities team to fill large bladders with drinkable water at staged water points. The TWPS is carried on a 7-ton truck, and can be set up by an engineer support unit in approximately 30 minutes. In Afghanistan, there are 21 of these systems. The TWPS more than doubles the production capacity of the older reverse osmosis water purification units that has treated water for a generation of military troops.

Currently, there are 14 Marine Corps water points in the Afghan theater, with 21 TWPS and 25 LWPS units. An additional 14 to 15 LWPS units were recenty delivered.

Col. Robert J. Charette Jr., head of the commandant’s expeditionary energy office, noted: “We’ve cut down a lot of the bottled water use by having alternative systems and other solutions for our commanders. That having been said, local commanders still make the call as to what is in the best interests of their marines.”  

While there is neither a mandate nor policy directive, he added, “We are encouraging commanders to use the LWPS and TWPS. Every time you have to move large amounts of bottled water, we put our marines at risk.” He notes that troops will take some convincing before making the switch to purified water because many still harbor bad memories of poor-tasting water taken from water buffaloes, also known as bulls, and jerry cans.

Col. T.C. Moore is the Marine Corps’ operational liaison to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the team leader for the Marine Corps energy assessment team which was charged by former Commandant Gen. James Conway in 2009 to assess the fully burdened cost of delivering essential supplies in Afghanistan. “Hauling water makes up 51 percent of the logistical burden,” Moore said. His team calculated that a gallon of water at the tactical edge in Afghanistan costs the military $4.78, compared to the assured delivery price of $1.42 per gallon. “The Marine Corps should be focusing on finding solutions at the tactical edge,” said Moore, including using indigenous sources of water wherever possible and making investments in more water-efficient technologies at forward operating bases.

Conway had stated that purifying water in Afghanistan can potentially take 50 trucks off the road.

Bottled water currently is big business in Afghanistan. U.S. forces, foreign government officials and aid workers drink bottled water at an estimated cost of $100 million per year. Several Afghan companies are exploiting the opportunity, including Afghan Beverage Industries (ABI), an Afghan-owned company that opened a bottling plant in Kabul in 2006. The company produces a water brand called Cristal.

The operations director of ABI notes that the expatriate community is the biggest consumer of bottled water, and predicts that the more affluent Afghans will start leaning toward bottled water because of the status it reflects. In 2008, ABI became the first Afghan company to win a contract to supply bottled water to the U.S. military forces. At the company’s $26 million plant on the outskirts of Kabul, ABI can manufacture 13,000 50-centiliter bottles per hour. In addition to about 15 foreign workers, the firm employs about 170 locals.

Another issue is how to deal with empty and discarded plastic bottles. They produce a lot of waste, which is often burned in pits that are located right in the center of bases. This can create toxic emissions. Safety regulations warn that bottles and packaged field water should not be stored in direct sunlight because the light and warmth support bacterial growth in the water. Water should be stored in shaded, well-ventilated areas and in boxes which keep the caps elevated.

If transportation, handling and storage conditions are poor — which they often are in Afghanistan — bottled water may pose a greater risk of illness for consumers than water from quartermaster-operated bulk supply systems.  

Several research labs are working on squad-level systems to purify water in streams, pools and irrigation ditches, said Vince Goulding, director of the experiment division at the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory. He led a recent exercise in Hawaii that focused on the water challenge.

“Frankly, one of the big take-aways from the experiment was that we spent an awful lot of time and precious helicopter sorties moving water around in rough terrain,” he said. “And once you resupply [troops] with water, you negatively impact their mobility, because what they don’t drink or put into their CamelBaks, they have to carry.”

The biggest problem right now is the standard for water purification, said Goulding. “The federal fit-for-human-consumption test is very rigorous and a hurdle we need to overcome for tactical water purification. I’m a little concerned about that standard, having been raised in the era of putting an iodine tablet into a canteen and shaking it. But our experiment did demonstrate how we need to reduce our dependency on moving bottled water around the battlefield and putting marines at risk in convoys and helicopters delivering it when [units] are co-located with local water sources.”

At Marine Corps Base Quantico last year, representatives of Shift Power Solutions, of Encinitas, Calif., demonstrated a reverse-osmosis water purifier that produces approximately 2,500 gallons of potable water a day. Four of the suitcase-size units were used in Haiti during humanitarian assistance operations for earthquake-relief. The large water-filtration systems currently used in the field, which are some 60-feet long, are not good options for a platoon on the move. Small units need portable equipment that can be quickly set up, so troops can filter enough water to fill their hydration packs within a few minutes, or shower, and then keep moving.

There is little guidance or regulations for water testing. It’s frequently not clear in combat zones just who determines if the water is safe. The Army often prefers to buy National Sanitation Foundation (NSF)-certified water purification systems, but those are far more expensive. The portable Shift Power Solutions unit is not NSF certified, but all the components that make up the system are. Water purification systems can cost as much as $200,000 for the large units, but portable ones are less than half of that. The Army reportedly plans to begin testing Shift’s reverse-osmosis devices at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Md.  

In Afghanistan, said Charette, “One of the biggest problems regarding water storage and distribution is that marines have grown accustomed to bottled water, and more than half of the weight they carry on patrol is bottled water though it is not proven to be any cleaner than locally purified water.” Although there is plenty of water to purify on the battlefield, he said, troops are not familiar, nor comfortable with purifying water. “The bottom line is that we have become a bit spoiled, and therefore heavy and less mobile,” he said. “We have to convince unit commanders and leadership that solutions are available now, and that we need to do everything that we can to reduce this tremendous burden and decrease our dependence on bottled water.”

Gunnery Sgt. Jason Parrish, who works at the engineers office at the Marine Corps Systems Command, said that utilities and water specialists are ready to accept the challenge of providing water purification in Afghanistan and reducing the reliance on bottled water. “As more unit commanders evaluate the problem and begin submitting urgent universal needs statements (UUNS), we’ll be able to provide our 1171s, or water support technicians, and the types of water purification units we now have available.”  

The more unit commanders see the water purification demonstrations and understand what they can do, the more they will become advocates for the technology, Parrish said. “We have the capability and we are confident that we can do the job,” he said. “Water guys don’t drink bottled water. They drink the water that comes out of our systems, because it’s better than bottled water.”  

He believes that the turning point, when marines begin using more local, purified water than the bottled variety, will come after one of the UUNS statements that requests a small unit water purification system (for platoon-size elements) becomes an official “requirement and can become a program of record.”

There is much optimism at many levels of command that solutions are on their way, and they couldn’t come sooner, especially for fighting forces in Afghanistan.

Fred C. Lash is a communication and outreach officer at the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, Quantico, Va.

 


Changing the flow of downrange water

New purifiers eliminating need for bottle shipments

A bulk-water tank that will purify water siphoned from the Kunar River could enable Forward Operating Base Bostick to nearly eliminate its dependence on bottled water, according to Capt. Steve Nachowicz.

NAPLES, Italy — NATO spends about 50 million euro a year to ship approximately 200 million half-liter bottles of water to NATO bases in Afghanistan, often across long and dangerous supply routes.

Increasingly, those stationed at forward bases are purifying their own water — reducing cost, risk and the need to dispose of those millions of plastic bottles. Some even say the purified water tastes better.

ISAF spokesman Tim James, who provided the statistics on the cost of moving the water, said much of it is shipped from Pakistan via long and dangerous supply routes that have repeatedly faced insurgent attacks.

“There is a significant effort to increase the amount of water sourced from within Afghanistan,” James said in an email.

According to National Defense Magazine, the Marines are using 25 Lightweight Water Purification Systems. Each can fit in a Humvee and pump out 125 gallons of potable water per hour.Image_19839112.jpg

The service has 21 Tactical Water Purification Systems in place as well, according to the article, which can filter up to 1,500 gallons an hour.

Marine units are not mandated to use the systems, but are encouraged to do so, Col. Robert J. Charette Jr., head of the commandant’s expeditionary energy office, told National Defense.

“Every time you have to move large amounts of bottled water, we put our Marines at risk,” he said.

According to National Defense, a Marine Corps team tasked with figuring out the full cost of delivering essential supplies to Afghanistan found that hauling water takes up 51 percent of the logistical burden.

A gallon of water delivered to hot spots in-country costs the military $4.78, according to National Defense.

The U.S. Navy is testing the use of unmanned helicopters to deliver water and other supplies.

NATO commands in the north and southwest draw water from local wells that is purified and bottled for use, James said.

More wells are being created across the country, James said, with a large bottling plant set to open in Kandahar later this year.

ISAF Joint Command does not track how many gallons of water are produced annually by the coalition; many nations don’t report water data, according to command spokesman Sgt. 1st Class Eric Brown.

The Marine Corps has several efforts under way to wean units off the costly and dangerous-to-deliver bottled water.

At the Musa Qala district center in Helmand province, home of 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, the ubiquitous pallets of water seen at bases throughout the war have been replaced by a lightweight purification system.

There are six systems in the battalion’s area of operations — two at battalion headquarters, two at Company K headquarters in Talibjan, and two in Now Zad. The HQ uses between 400 and 500 gallons of purified water daily.

The majority of water used by the companies in the battalion, spread across Musa Qala and Now Zad districts, is now purified by Marines, according to Cpl. Joseph Laflamme, who oversees water at the district center.

“It tastes pretty good, actually, in my opinion,” Laflamme said. “I almost would rather drink the water out of this than bottled water.”

Laflamme said it tastes better than bottled even after chlorine has been added, so the water can stand for longer periods before use.

“And I know I made it, or our guys made it,” he said, “so being able to drink what you made is more rewarding.”

The Marines have deployed the lightweight systems to 25 locations, and “tactical” purification systems to larger camps, though they did not specify a number.

Army Capt. Steve Nachowicz, the support company commander for the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division stationed at Forward Operating Base Bostick in Kunar province, plans to curb his unit’s dependence on bottled water by month’s end.

He said the base receives three water shipments a day via helicopter. Each delivery consists of three pallets holding 120 cases of bottled water, with a dozen half-liter bottles per case.

Not long after arriving this spring with the rest of the unit, Nachowicz, of Bolingbrook, Ill., found an unused bulk-water tank. The hulking machine can purify 1,500 gallons of water an hour through reverse osmosis.

In simple terms, the tank removes bacteria and other unwanted microscopic detritus by pushing water at a high pressure through a ceramic membrane that acts as a filter.

When the tank is moved into position sometime in the next couple of weeks, a large hose will siphon water from the nearby Kunar River. The purified water will be stored in a 50,000-gallon container and drawn off into 500-gallon cylinders that can be moved anywhere on base.

Running the machine two to three hours a day could nearly eliminate the need for bottled water at Bostick.

“We’re trying to reduce the cost of having water brought in here,” Nachowicz said, “and we’re trying to reduce the amount of waste — all the plastic bottles that have to be burned.”

The U.S. tried something similar five years ago in Iraq by having the six largest bases produce their own drinking water to reduce the number of supply convoys on the road.

Geoffz@estripes.osd.mil
Twitter:
@Stripes_GeoffZ

millhamm@estripes.osd.mil
Twitter:
@mattmillham

kuzm@estripes.osd.mil
Twitter: @martinkuz

 

Water Dogs on Tinian purify Pacific 5/22/2012

Seabees adopt new water purification system; increase safety, versatility 7/5/2012

Two engineer support battalions work as one 7/26/2012

MWSS-374: Paving a better future 8/16/2012

Water purification specialists field new lightweight system at Fort Pickett

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http://www.marines.mil/unit/24thmeu/Pages/120412-MoroccoTWPS.aspx#.UGNHwERkEdU

4/12/2012

Marines hydrate with purified ocean water 

By Sgt. Richard Blumenstein, Marine Forces Africa 

usmclogo

AGADIR, Morocco  — Water purification specialists with Combat Logistics Battalion 24, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, put their water purification systems to the test on a Moroccan beach April 10, during the bi-lateral exercise named African Lion 2012.

The Marines assembled a Tactical Water Purification System (TWPS) and Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) on the beach to turn ocean water into a sustainable, potable water source for the Marines conducting training operations with the Royal Moroccan Armed Forces, and test the systems on a foreign water source.

“Instead of bringing thousands of pallets of water ashore, this is what we use,” said Cpl. Kyle Slusher, a water purification specialist with CLB 24. “This is what’s going to sustain our force, and we can use it wherever there is a water source.”
Marines use water purification systems to sustain their forces and also to provide water for a number of other operations such as disaster relief, and humanitarian assistance, according to Cpl. Cody Sorrell, a water purification specialist.

“We can use this capability for any sort of mission where Marines are going to be there a long period of time,” Sorrell said. “You can’t conduct operations without a sustainable water source.”

The current mission is to provide a clean water source for Marines training ashore in the desert landscape of Morocco. The water these Marines are sustaining the training units ashore who are working with members of the Moroccan military. Without this capability, the logistics problem of supplying clean water to the shores of Morocco would become a problem of time and money that would distract from the mission of training between the Marines and Moroccans.

The TWPS is 10,000 pounds, and able to purify approximately 10,000 gallons of water a day by pumping it through a series of filters, which reduce the TDS (total dissolved solids) rating to a level more than fit for human consumption. Pound for pound for Marines on the ground, it is more than worth its weight in water.

“It’s better than bottled water,” said Slusher. According to the Marion, Ohio native, the average bottle of water has a TDS ratting between 400 and 500. Using the TWPS, water purification specialist can reduce the TDS ratting to 20.

“A bottle of water from the TWPS is more pure than what you would get from a factory,” he said. “It’s because the only thing we have to add back into the water is chlorine to preserve it.”

The TWPS has the ability to purify water ranging from lake water to nuclear contaminated water, he said.
“If a nuclear bomb went off behind me, we would be able to provide contaminate free water in an hour,” he said.

The LWPS is a smaller version of the TWPS. While not able to boast the same range of capabilities as the TWPS, its use is focused on supplying a small force. Weighing 3,580 pounds the system is able to provide around 2,000 gallons of water a day.

“We use this somewhere we have a really small foot print,” he said.

The last opportunity the Marines had to test their system’s capabilities was in September 2011 at Fort Pickett, Va., where they filtered lake water, substantially easy to filter in comparison to the salty ocean water they now face in Morocco, according to Slusher.

“Right now we’re showing we can get in, set up and operate it anywhere,” he said.


 

Iwakuni news

Water Dogs on Tinian purify Pacific

5/22/2012  By Lance Cpl. J. Gage Karwick, Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni 

TINIAN, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands  — Water purification technicians with Marine Wing Support Squadron 171, Marine Aircraft Group 12, provide what could be considered the most critical resource to any exercise, operation and survival.

Without purified water, any mission is at risk. Marines suffering from dehydration, heat exhaustion, heat stroke or water contamination may not be able to perform the tasks they deployed to do.

The water purification technicians have set up shop on Chulu Beach on the island of Tinian in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, the same beach Marines used to conduct a tactical maneuver recorded in history as “the perfect amphibious landing” during World War II.

“We are providing water for this entire exercise,” said Lance Cpl. Fabian A. Gomezortiz, a water purification technician with MWSS-171, MAG-12.

“The fresh water supply on the island is very limited. In order for the Marines here to be able to operate and not affect the supply of water the islanders need, it is crucial that we do our jobs as efficiently as possible.”

The ‘water dogs’ take salt water from the Pacific Ocean and circulate it through their light-weight purification system. “This system basically does reverse osmosis,” said Cpl. Adam Santana Jr., a water purification technician with MWSS-171, MAG-12. “It cleans the water by circulating it through several filters and high pressure pumps removing all harmful sediments and bacteria.”

Clean water can be a valuable morale booster as well. “With this water, the Marines will be able to take a clean shower,” said Santana. “A nice shower after working all day in this heat can really change someone’s mood drastically from feeling bad to feeling great.”

The ability to provide troops with clean potable water has been a key figure in military expeditions throughout history.

The ‘Water Dogs’ on Tinian will provide their fellow Marines with clean water throughout the entirety of Exercise Geiger Fury 2012.

TinianTINIAN, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands — Lance Cpl. Fabian A. Gomezortiz, Marine Wing Support Squadron 171, Marine Aircraft Group 12, water purification technician, records the activities of the light-weight purification system May 21 during exercise Geiger Fury 2012.

 

 


Seabee Courier

July 5, 2012


Camp Lejeune, NC, July 25, 2012

Two engineer support battalions work as one

7/26/2012  By Pfc. Franklin E. Mercado  , 2nd Marine Logistics Group

CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.  — Marines from 6th and 8th Engineer Support Battalions tested their forward deployed capabilities during a week-long exercise here from July 23 to 27.

While deployed to places like Afghanistan, engineer support Marines provide servicemembers with potable water used for drinking and cooking, water for showers and other hygiene stations, as well as repair driving routes that are regularly used by heavy up-armored vehicles.

During their training exercise, they purified thousands of gallons of water and set up eight showers near Mile Hammock Bay, a training area adjacent to Camp Lejeune. They also improved about one mile of road at Onslow Beach here.

Together, the battalions set up a Tactical Water Purification System and a Light-Weight Water Purification System to pump clean water into tanks. There were three 20,000-gallon and two 50,000-gallon tanks that had to be filled.

"We have a lot of water to pump, and they're really helping us," said Lance Cpl. Mario MedenaValdez, a water support technician with 8th ESB, on the third day of training. "We're working well together. We have 37,000 gallons of water already, so we're setting a good pace."

Marines from both battalions completed the mission as if they’d been working together for longer than the beginning of the week.

"Sixth ESB has stepped up and helped us out with this exercise," said 1st Lt. Lennie Jackson, the Engineer Support Company executive officer. "With [most of] 8th ESB deployed now, we are limited in the number of personnel we have."

The training is not only helping 8th ESB meet training requirements, but it's helping prepare the Marines of 6th ESB for Afghanistan. They are slated to deploy in the upcoming months.

"They're doing an outstanding job," Capt. Donald Galloway, the ES company commander, said about the Marines of 6th ESB. "They are very motivated.”

Throughout the training both battalions have kept that motivation and worth ethic at a high level. The unit’s have shown they are truly capable of performing multiple missions at the same time. There was no better time for 6th ESB to prove they are capable of taking the reins upon arriving in Afghanistan, with the battalion taking authority from 8th ESB’s forward deployed element. They seized the opportunity.

 

Lej1


USMClogo

MWSS-374: Paving a better future

8/16/2012 By Lance Cpl. Uriel Avendano , Headquarters Marine Corps

YUMA, Ariz. — Breaking new ground isn’t easy. Building a foundation, in the most literal sense, is hard work.
Just ask the engineer company of Marine Wing Support Squadron 374, based out of Twentynine Palms, Calif., who are refurbishing the landing zone assault strip at the Bull Assault Forward Arming and Refueling Point site located in the Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range in California, Aug. 9.
"The majority of the work of bringing it out here was done by motor transportation. Utilities set up all the water points," said Sgt. Juan Flores, the MWSS-374 project manager and a native of Houston, Texas. "And, obviously, the heavy equipment engineers worked on the ground here."
MWSS-374 electronically surveyed, gauged, and measured the site to determine the terrain conditions. Then, construction began on Aug. 1.
“The most difficult part was keeping with the terrain, making sure the landing strip is within regulations," said Gunnery Sgt. Ramiro Chavez Jr., the MWSS-374 engineer equipment chief and a native of Naples, Fla.
After layering up to six inches of Recycled Asphalt Product (RAP) and using Portland cement to provide greater strength and better durability, it will then be compacted and paved to a smooth finish. SeaTac, a biodegradable and environmentally safe product that will reduce dust and prevent erosion, will also be used to deliver a safer strip to land on for pilots during training exercises.
"The local Marines will be able to use this LZ as a good training environment for future FARP operations,” said Chavez.
For Flores, LZ Bull marks his first operation as project manager.
"This is a learning experience for me as well. I've been mentored by my gunnery sergeant and my officer-in-charge," said Flores. "I have some other corporals who have done this before, so I'm feeding off of them and their ideas, their suggestions."
The utilities platoon with MWSS-374 is also experiencing a first with a new water recycling system. The lightweight water purification system uses 3,000-gallon collapsible tanks that pump and filter out clean water allowing Marines to better conserve resources.
“I don’t believe it’s been done in the Marine Corps,” said Sgt. Wol G. Deng, MWSS-374 water support technician who enlisted out of Fargo, ND, but is originally from South Sudan, Africa. “It’s been going very well. We test the water every time we purify it. And it’s been passing, meeting standards.”
The project also protects the Corps’ monetary interests.
“Not having to repair this air strip semi-annually will definitely save the Marine Corps money,” said 2nd Lt. Colin Hunter Cunningham, the MWSS-374 utilities officer-in-charge and a native of New Jersey.
The usual cracks, wears and tears would normally have Marines come out every year. With these improvements, LZ Bull will need less maintenance less often.
"A message to my Marines: thank you for your hard work," said Flores.
Construction is expected to be completed by Aug. 15.

LWPS LeJeune

Marines with Marine Wing Support Squadron 374, based out of Twentynine Palms, Calif., work on a new water purification system at the Chocolate Mountains Aerial Gunnery Range in MCAS Yuma region, Aug. 9. The lightweight purification water recycling system uses 3,000 gallon collapsible tanks that pump and filter out clean water which allows Marines to better conserve resources.
Photo Date Taken: 8/9/2012
Unit: Headquarters Marine Corps
Photo ByLine: Lance Cpl. Uriel Avendano


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26th Marine Expeditionary Unit

A Certain Force in an Uncertain World

Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

Water purification specialists field new lightweight system at Fort Pickett

By Cpl. Kyle N. Runnels | September 10, 2012
Combat Logistics Battalion 26, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, is fielding their new lightweight water purification system at Fort Pickett, Va., in September.
Staff Sgt. Joshua C. Collins, Largo, Fla., native and CLB-26 utilities chief said, according to the Naval Preventative Medical Manual, a Marine or sailor requires 20 gallons of water a day to sustain military operations.
The number for the water required is factored from everything including showers, laundry, drinking water and the water used to prepare food for chow said Lance Cpl. Logan B. Vasquenz, Bloomington, Ill., native and CLB-26 water purification specialist.
“Our old system, the (Tactical Water Purification System), is rated to filter 1,500 gallons per hour when it is used with fresh water,” said Collins. “We can set the whole system up and filter 6,000 gallons of water in four to six hours. It can run 18-20 hours per day on 20 gallons of gas and single handedly provide enough clean water for the entire (26th Marine Expeditionary Unit).”
With space being a critical asset in operations, size is a large factor when determining the viability of any type of cargo.
Vasquenz said, CLB-26 is testing and using the new LWPS because it is highly mobile.
“The new system is on a smaller scale, based off the numbers from the TWPS. It can roughly sustain and maintain a company-sized level with clean water,” said Collins. “Some of the advantages of the new system are it is self-sustained and fits inside a Quadcon, capable of being moved around on the back of a truck and fitting into smaller areas vice the TWPS which weighs more than 10,000 pounds and is hard to get into tight areas.”
A Quadcon is a stackable military shipping container that can hold more than 200 cubic feet and hold more than four tons.
Although both water systems have distinct advantages, CLB-26 is pushing to completely transition into the LWPS. It only takes two Marines to set up the system and only one Marine to properly operate it.
Capable of properly filtering water in almost all conditions, including freezing temperatures, Collins said, the water purification specialists of CLB-26 are capable of filtering chemical, biological and nerve agents from any water source.
He said the process starts by the system pulling the water in from any fresh, salt or brackish water source into the raw water system where it is then discharged into a micro-filtration feed tank. After going through 12 micro-filters it becomes feed water, then put into the reverse osmosis feed tank creating RO feed water. Next, the water is pushed through two high-pressure pumps, and then through a turbo charger ending up in the RO elements where calcium hyper chloride is added creating clean, purified water. The water is kept in 3,000-gallon storage tanks ready to be picked up and distributed among troops.
“If you don’t have water on deck in any kind of mission in the Marine Corps, you are not going to survive,” said Collins. “Marines will start dying within a couple days of not having portable water to consume and won’t be able to carry on the fight or continue the mission.”

water dogs

Water purification specialists with Combat Logistics Battalion (CLB) 26, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), test their filtered water’s purity at Fort Pickett, Va., Sept. 10, 2012. The Marines are testing the battalions new lightweight water purification system capable of producing up to 450 gallons of clean water per hour from any available water source. This field testing is part of the 26th MEU's pre-deployment training program. CLB-26 is one of the three reinforcements of 26th MEU, which is slated to deploy in 2013. (Photo by Cpl. Kyle N. Runnels)

LWPS full bags

A lightweight water purification system is set up at Fort Pickett, Va., Sept. 10, 2012. The system is Combat Logistics Battalion's (CLB) 26, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), new water filtration system capable of cleaning 450 gallons of water per hour producing enough drinking water for an entire company. This training is part of the 26th MEU's pre-deployment training program. CLB-26 is one of the three reinforcements of 26th MEU, which is slated to deploy in 2013. (Photo by Cpl. Kyle N. Runnels)

water dogs

Staff Sgt. Joshua C. Collins, Largo, Fla., Native, utilities chief and Lance Cpl. Logan B. Vasquenz, Bloomington, Ill., native, water purification specialist assigned to Combat Logistics Battalion (CLB) 26, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), test the battalions new lightweight water purification system's pressure at Fort Pickett, Va., Sept. 10, 2012. The new system is capable of producing enough clean drinking water for an entire company and is much smaller than its predecessor, capable of fitting all parts necessary to properly function into a single shipping container. This training is part of the 26th MEU's pre-deployment training program. CLB-26 is one of the three reinforcements of 26th MEU, which is slated to deploy in 2013. (Photo by Cpl. Kyle N. Runnels)

water dog

Lance Cpl. Eric D. Rivera, a Houston, Texas, native, water purification specialist assigned to Combat Logistics Battalion (CLB) 26, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), tests the chlorine levels in the battalions new lightweight water purification system at Fort Pickett, Va., Sept. 10, 2012. This is the first time the battalion has fielded the purification system, which can pump water from a local water source and filter 450 gallons per hour of clean drinking water. This training is part of the 26th MEU's pre-deployment training program. CLB-26 is one of the three reinforcements of 26th MEU, which is slated to deploy in 2013. (Photo by Cpl. Kyle N. Runnels)

water dog

Lance Cpl. Eric D. Rivera, a Houston, Texas native, water purification specialist assigned to Combat Logistics Battalion (CLB) 26, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), tests the chlorine levels in the battalions new lightweight water purification system at Fort Pickett, Va., Sept. 10, 2012. This is the first time the battalion has fielded the purification system, which can pump water from a local water source and filter 450 gallons per hour of clean drinking water. This training is part of the 26th MEU's pre-deployment training program. CLB-26 is one of the three reinforcements of 26th MEU, which is slated to deploy in 2013. (Photo by Cpl. Kyle N. Runnels)

water dog

Lance Cpl. Eric D. Rivera, a Houston, Texas, native, water purification specialist assigned to Combat Logistics Battalion (CLB) 26, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), tests the chlorine levels in the battalions new lightweight water purification system at Fort Pickett, Va., Sept. 10, 2012. This is the first time the battalion has fielded the purification system, which can pump water from a local water source and filter 450 gallons per hour of clean drinking water. This training is part of the 26th’s pre-deployment training program. CLB-26 is one of the three reinforcements of 26th MEU, which is slated to deploy in 2013. (Photo by Cpl. Kyle N. Runnels)

Keystone Edge logoThursday, September 06, 2012

Innovation & Job News

Allentown's TerraGroup looks to water down its U.S. military concentration, hiring up to 12

Thursday, September 06, 2012
Envisioning the day when water is more valuable than oil, Primo Acernese is diverting his company, Allentown's TerraGroup Corp., toward new markets. 

Founded in 1991, Terra's core business for 15 years has been in providing lightweight water purification systems to the U.S. military. Now Terra is focusing its R&D on adapting its products for civilian uses, including emergency responders and residential customers, and is eying foreign military sales.

Availability of potable water is critical in natural disasters, says Acernese, noting how even a relatively small hurricane like Isaac could play havoc on the Gulf Coast. So Terra is looking to a modified version of its military product for agencies like the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Homeland Security. A miniaturized and more affordable home system is also under study. 

Meanwhile, Terra is in the midst of a $50 million contract than runs into 2014 to provide water systems to the Marine Corps. Terra's self-contained systems allow forward units to produce potable water from any source: fresh or seawater, brackish and even water polluted by chemical, biological and nuclear contaminants. The units can be set up in under 40 minutes by two people and are virtually indestructible, Acernese says. 

So far, Terra has delivered 250 systems with 120 to go. The huge contract has meant significant growth; as recently as 2005, Terra had only four employees. Today, the company employs 27 – mostly Allentown residents – and anticipates another 8 to 12 hires over the next 24 months. 

Source: Primo Acernese, Terra Group
Writer: Elise Vider

 

Marines test water purification equipment, systems

Naval Mobile Construction Battalion NMCB 133 Participates in Water Pump Instruction Video

Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group

Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5

 

LWPS: Water, Water, Anywhere for the USMC

Nov 18, 2013 14:21 UTC by Defense Industry Daily staff

You can live for weeks without food. A week without water will leave you dead, especially if you’re exerting yourself in unfriendly conditions. More bad news: water is heavy to carry, which means it takes a lot of resources to transport. There are all kinds of very clever single-soldier external link solutions for purifying water, but bases and outposts will need options that can scale and produce a steady supply. The US Marines are looking for expeditionary solutions, and TerraGroup’s TECWAR external link will be selling them some.

Nov 18/13: TerraGroup Corp. in Allentown, PA receives a $49.9 million firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/ indefinite-quantity contract for their Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS). The initial $15 million delivery order (#0001) buys LWPS and enhanced pump modules using FY 2013 procurement finds, and delivery is expected to be complete by January 2015. This contract was competitively awarded via FBO.gov, with 3 offers received. US Marine Corps Systems Command in Quantico, VA manages this contract, on behalf of the USMC’s Product manager, expeditionary power systems and Program manager, combat support systems (M67854-14-D-5001).

The LWPS external link is a lightweight water purification system used to produce potable water from water sources such as rivers, lakes, wells, and oceans for Marines operating in austere environments. It includes generators, pumping, and reverse osmosis hyper-filtration for use by highly mobile teams in remote areas or emergency and temporary site. The entire system can load on a HMMWV utility variant.

LWPS flow rates are given as 2.5 Gal./ 9.5L per minute, or 150 US Gal./ 586L per hour. It can be operated and maintained by 1 operator, and general maintenance and repairs require no special tools as long as parts are present. System options include an Ocean Intake Structure System (OISS), Cold Weather Module (CWK), modules for Nuclear/ Biological/ Chemical contaminated environments; and an Increased Production Module (IPM) for really dirty sources.


 

Pfc. James E. Baker connects a lightweight water purification system hose at Kin Blue beach near Camp Hansen April 30. Baker and Griggs are water support technicians with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Henry J. Antenor)

Pfc. James E. Baker connects a lightweight water purification system hose at Kin Blue beach near Camp Hansen April 30. The purpose of the training exercise was to train new Marines and test the functionality of the water purification systems for future use within the Asia-Pacific region, according to Sgt. Anthony W. Griggs. Baker and Griggs are water support technicians with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Henry J. Antenor)

News: Marines test water purification equipment, systems

by: Lance Cpl. Henry J. Antenor
MCIPAC
published: May 06, 2013

KIN BLUE BEACH, Okinawa, Japan - Marines ran down the beach and entered the surf, taking their filtration system’s equipment with them. With the pull of a cord, the pump roared to life, drawing water through multiple layers of the filtration system, cleansing it until potable drinking water was produced.

Utilities Platoon with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172 executed water production operations on Kin Blue beach near Camp Hansen April 29 to May 3 in order to train new Marines and test the functionality of the water purification systems.

With an increased number of new Marines, it was important for the squadron to train the Marines in water purification operations, according to Staff Sgt. Pete Leyva III, an electrician with MWSS-172, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force.

“The training helps Marines meet their requirements, so they can go to future exercises and operations, and it teaches them what it takes to purify water in a field environment,” said Leyva.

MWSS-172 participates in a variety of exercises in the Asia-Pacific region where the squadron provides potable water for humanitarian assistance and disaster relief and other uses such as laundry and showers, according to Chief Warrant Officer Victor E. Velasquez, a utilities officer with MWSS-172.

“The purpose of MWSS-172 is to support MAG-36 and 1st MAW wherever we are needed, such as Exercise Balikatan or Operation Tomodachi,” said Velasquez. “Both the lightweight water purification system and tactical water purification system help us meet that requirement.”

The process of purifying water is a long, complicated task simplified with the specialized equipment, according to Velasquez.

Marines begin by inserting strainers into the surf. The strainers are attached to pumps that pull water from the ocean and move it through a series of filtration systems making the water potable.

“Situations that require this training include humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations, where the area we are assigned lacks water to drink,” said Sgt. Anthony W. Griggs, a water support technician with the squadron. “If there is a case where the water is contaminated, we have biological decontamination systems that come with the TWPS and LWPS to purify the water, so it is drinkable.”

Marines encountered some difficulties while training, such as changes in the tide, but the Marines overcame the issues and continued training.

“Each field exercise is different, forcing us to adapt, but it makes us better prepared the next time we train, and I am thankful for my unit to have that ability,” said Lance Cpl. Cecilia M. Mavrommatis, a water support technician with the squadron.

Okinawa-Hansen

Lance Cpl. Cecilia M. Mavrommatis, left, and Venicio S. Pedro drive a water table oceanic intake system strainer into the surf at Kin Blue beach near Camp Hansen April 30. Marine Wing Support Squadron 172 participates in a variety of exercises in the Asia-Pacific region where the squadron provides potable water for consumption and other everyday uses such as laundry and showers. Mavrommatis is a water support technician and Pedro is a refrigeration and air conditioning technician. Both are with MWSS-172, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Henry J. Antenor)


NMCB 133 Participates in Water Pump Instruction Video

By Lt. j.g. Jason Spotts

GULFPORT, Miss. - Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133’s Air Detachment participated in the production of an instructional training video for the Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) June 10.

The film, recorded on a local Gulfport beach, featured Utilitiesman 3rd Class Nathan Gaffney, Utilitiesman 3rd Class Brandon Huot and Utilitiesman Constructionman Matthew Kicinski deploying the pump and intake system into the Gulf of Mexico while two cameramen and Naval Construction Training Center (NCTC) Gulfport Utilities Instructor Darcy Mogler directed the evolution.

The training video will be part of the new curriculum for the Utilitiesman (UT) C1 Advanced course, Water Treatment, which was piloted from January to April. The training video will also be available under the UT Portal on Navy Knowledge Online (NKO) for personnel who wish to refresh themselves, or for commands to conduct Unit Driven Training (UDT).

The portion of the video shot June 10 focuses on the deployment of the pump and intake system, which then sends raw water to the filtration and chlorination systems and on to a storage bladder.

While the training video is just a small part of a much larger, ongoing Seabee training reset, the efforts of the three UTs will complement course instruction, providing visual aids to enhance course material and will facilitate more efficient training, permitting personnel to see the process step-by-step.

NMCB 133 is currently in a home-port training cycle in preparation for their next deployment.

Utilitiesman 3rd Class Nathan Gaffney from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 133 starts the pump for a Lightweight Water Purification System during the production of a training video. The video will be used in an advanced water treatment course offered to Navy Seabees at the Naval Construction Training Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g Jason Spotts/Released)

Utilitiesman Constructionman Matthew Kicinski from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 133 prepares to insert an intake strainer into the Gulf of Mexico during the production of a training video. The video will be used in an advanced water treatment course offered to Navy Seabees at the Naval Construction Training Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g Jason Spotts/Released)

Utilitiesman 3rd Class Brandon Huot from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB)133 pours water into a priming tube of a Lightweight Water Purification System pump during the production of a training video. The video will be used in an advanced water treatment course offered to Navy Seabees at the Naval Construction Training Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g Jason Spotts/Released)


Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group

(NAVELSG) July 23, 2013 LWPS Training

Construction Mechanic 3rd Class Lawrence Knight, from Yorktown, Va., attached to Navy Cargo Handling Battalion (NCHB 1), checks for zero pressure during back flushing operations on the Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) at Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group (NAVELSG) July 23. LWPS is a reverse osmosis modular unit that is equipped for small-scale water purification in any field condition. NAVELSG provides expeditionary logistics capability for the Navy and joint service customers. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward Kessler/Released)

Daniel Hillenbrand, from Allentown, Pa., with the TerraGroup Corporation, instructs Sailors from Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group (NAVELSG) on the Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) July 23. LWPS is a reverse osmosis modular unit that is equipped for small-scale water purification in any field condition. NAVELSG provides expeditionary logistics capability for the Navy and joint service customers. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward Kessler/Released)

Utilitiesman 3rd Class Matthew Graeve, from Lincoln, Neb., attached to Explosive Ordnance Disposal - Expeditionary Support Unit 2 (EOD-ESU 2), checks the pressure gage during back flushing operations on the Lightweight Water Purification System (LPWS) at Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group (NAVELSG) July 23. LWPS is a reverse osmosis modular unit that is equipped for small-scale water purification in any field condition. NAVELSG provides expeditionary logistics capability for the Navy and joint service customers. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward Kessler/Released)

Equipment Operator 1st Class John Lufholm (left), from Newport News, Va., assigned to Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group (NAVELSG), and Daniel Hillenbrand (right), from Allentown, Pa., with the Terragroup Corporation, review back flushing procedures on the Lightweight Water Purification System (LPWS) NAVELSG July 23. LWPS is a reverse osmosis modular unit that is equipped for small scale, water purification in any field condition. NAVELSG provides expeditionary logistics capability for the Navy and joint service customers. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward Kessler/Released)

Daniel Hillenbrand, from Allentown, Pa., with the Terragroup Corporation, instructs sailors from Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group (NAVELSG) on the Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) July 23. LWPS is a reverse osmosis modular unit that is equipped for small-scale water purification in any field condition. NAVELSG provides expeditionary logistics capability for the Navy and joint service customers. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward Kessler/Released)


Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5

Hometown: Port Hueneme, Calif., CA, US

Builder Constructionman Kelvin Chen, from Loveland, Colo., directs Seabees where to place a part of the lightweight water purification system while learning how to assemble the system and how it operates. Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5 conducted block training evolutions to increase the combat proficiency of the Seabees assigned to the command and to test the equipment used during field operations. NMCB 5 is currently supporting Navy and joint forces throughout the U.S. Pacific Command. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John P. Curtis/Released)



 

 

© Copyright Hawaii Marine 2013. All Rights Reserved.

CLB-3 perfects water purification

Posted: April 11, 2014

Cpl. Nathan Knapke 
Marine Corps Base Hawaii

Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 3 ensured the bases personnel will always have clean drinking water by conducting water purification systems training at Fort Hase Beach, April 9, 2014.

Marines used the tactical water purification system and lightweight purification system during their exercises. During an emergency, both systems can be set up in less than an hour.

“Our Marines can make clean drinking water in just 45 minutes,” said Staff Sgt. Jean Regis, the CLB-3 operations chief and a 41-year-old native of New York City. “We have the ability to support the entire base with water using ocean water.”

The TWPS is the louder and larger of the two systems but can filter an average of 1,200 gallons of freshwater per hour.

It is used for large-scale purification when needed. During the training evolution, CLB-3 Marines operated and maintained four TWPS systems.

The LWPS, the smaller and quieter unit, is used for small-scale purification or when water needs to be pumped quickly and quietly. Marines operated and maintained three of these systems while they pumped an average of 75 gallons of freshwater per hour.

Even though the unit’s main goal is to provide enough filtered water to the base during an emergency with the TWPS and LWPS, both systems have other uses for the Marine Corps.

“We can bring these systems to other countries who don’t have fresh water available to them for whatever reason,” said Lance Cpl. Jose Lopez, a hygiene equipment operator with CLB-3 and 20-year-old native of Houston. “Providing a clean water source is a great tool to use if we ever needed to help people in another country. There are endless problems this system can solve.”

“The water we are filtering from the ocean is cleaner than any water you can drink out of a plastic bottle,” Regis said. “I know it’s better because all the Marines, including myself, drink the water we filter. We drink what we make.”

 

Marines install water purification system in Honduras

Images from the 2016 TECWAR® Systems calendar

August 2015 Typhoon Soudelor relief effort on Saipan

 

 

 


 

Marines install water purification system in Honduras

PUERTO CASTILLA, Honduras (Aug. 10, 2015) U.S. Marine water purification specialists assigned to 8th Engineer Support Battalion in Camp Lejeune, N.C., disassemble the lightweight water purification system in Puerto Castilla, Honduras. The Marines are a part of the Adaptive Force Package in support of Southern Partnership Station-Joint High Speed Vessel 2015 (SPS-JHSV 15). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Kathleen Gorby)

PUERTO CASTILLA, Honduras (NNS) -- Service members assigned to 8th Engineer Support Battalion from Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, deployed to Honduras July 24 as part of the water purification team.

This team is part of the Adaptive Force Package (AFP) in support of the Southern Partnership Station-Joint High Speed Vessel 2015 (SPS-JHSV 15).

The team is in charge of ensuring the base camp of operations for the AFP has enough water for showers and if necessary, drinking water for 125 joint-service personnel on ground.

The Marines use the Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) to purify dirty water in order to provide quality water that can support small units. The LWPS is man-portable and can be set-up in as little as 45 minutes by one person.

Cpl. Wesley Tronolone, a native of Roanoke, Virginia, is the Water Purification Specialist in charge of the LWPS team consisting of four Marines and a Navy preventive medicine Corpsman, the primary team for water production of the base camp. His team is responsible for providing clean and safe water to camp.

"This system is better and cheaper than buying and outsourcing water," said Tronolone. "Fuel is the only thing that this system requires and where the money is spent."

The LWPS uses the Reverse Osmosis (RO) and Ultrafiltration (UF) technology that produces about 75 gallons per hour of fresh water from saltwater. It also uses chemical injections to treat the water with hypochlorite. After the water is purified the team tests the water to check its turbidity and how much chlorine is in the water.

Water Purification Specialist Lance Cpl. Mickenzie Mohs, a native of Becker, Minnesota, has been in the Marines for three years and serves as a water purification team member.

"This is one of the reasons why I joined the Marines, for humanitarian service and to help out people," said Mohs. "I am happy and satisfied to accomplish my mission."

SPS-JHSV 15 is an annual series of U.S. Navy deployments, fostering a lasting relationship with the host nations by promoting and enhancing regional stability and security through the sharing of experiences as well as humanitarian assistance missions and civil projects.

"The people here don't have all the resources that we do," said Mohs. "Helping them out definitively helps in bonding with the U.S."

 

 

CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)

 

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Chemical Biological Incident Response Force Marines from the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head, Md., participated in a CBIRF Engineer Field Exercise Oct. 17-20, 2016, at the Transportation Demonstration Support Area in Triangle, Va. During the exercise, Marines performed annual preventative maintenance services on various heavy equipment, such as the MCT 850 Cat Dozer and HYEX 250 Excavator, provided by Marine Corps Systems Command. Marines also refreshed their training on various systems, such as the Lightweight Water Purification System. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Ashley Calingo)


 

Field training exercise for CARAT Cambodia 2016

SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia

 

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SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia (Nov. 3, 2016) - A Royal Cambodian Navy (RCN) amphibious landing craft with U.S. Marines, from 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, Seabees, from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5, and RCN sailors prepares to beach during a field training exercise for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Cambodia, 2016. CARAT is a series of annual maritime exercises between the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and the armed forces of nine partner nations to include Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Timor-Leste. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Lowell Whitman/Released)

 

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SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia (Nov. 3, 2016) - A Royal Cambodian Navy (RCN) amphibious landing craft prepares to disembark U.S. Marines, from 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, Seabees, from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5, and RCN sailors during a field training exercise for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Cambodia, 2016. CARAT is a series of annual maritime exercises between the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and the armed forces of nine partner nations to include Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Timor-Leste. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Lowell Whitman/Released)

 

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SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia (Nov. 3, 2016) - U.S. Marines, from 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, Seabees, from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5, and Royal Cambodian Navy (RCN) sailors disembark an RCN amphibious landing craft during a field training exercise for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Cambodia, 2016. CARAT is a series of annual maritime exercises between the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and the armed forces of nine partner nations to include Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Timor-Leste. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Lowell Whitman/Released)

 

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SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia (Nov. 3, 2016) - U.S. Navy Seabees, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5, assemble a Lightweight Water Purification System during a field training exercise for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Cambodia, 2016. CARAT is a series of annual maritime exercises between the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and the armed forces of nine partner nations to include Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Timor-Leste. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Lowell Whitman/Released)

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SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia (Nov. 3, 2016) - U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Joshua Fulton, assigned to Commander, Task Force (CTF) 73, photographs Seabees, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5, as they anchor an intake hose for a Lightweight Water Purification System during a field training exercise for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Cambodia, 2016. CARAT is a series of annual maritime exercises between the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and the armed forces of nine partner nations to include Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Timor-Leste. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Lowell Whitman/Released)

 

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SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia (Nov. 3, 2016) - A Royal Cambodian Navy amphibious landing craft is beached as Seabees, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5, assemble a Lightweight Water Purification System on shore during a field training exercise for Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Cambodia, 2016. CARAT is a series of annual maritime exercises between the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and the armed forces of nine partner nations to include Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Timor-Leste. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Lowell Whitman/Released)

 

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SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia (Nov. 3, 2016) Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary Richardson unloads supplies during a combined field training exercise during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Cambodia 2016. CARAT is a series of annual maritime exercises between the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the armed forces of nine partner nations to include Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Timor-Leste. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/Released)

 

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SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia (Nov. 3, 2016) Seaman Michael King, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5, installs a Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) during a combined field training exercise during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Cambodia 2016. CARAT is a series of annual maritime exercises between the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the armed forces of nine partner nations to include Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Timor-Leste. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/Released)

 

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SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia (Nov. 3, 2016) Seaman Michael King, assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 5, installs a Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) during a combined field training exercise during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Cambodia 2016. CARAT is a series of annual maritime exercises between the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the armed forces of nine partner nations to include Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Timor-Leste. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/Released)

 

NEW CALEDONIA 06.27.2017 III Marine Expeditionary Force

Water Dogs, TONGATAPU ISLAND, TONGA 07.17.2017

U.S. Marines train Ugandan Soldiers in water purification

CLB15: Water Purification during Alligator Dagger DJIBOUTI 09.10.2017 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit

 

 

15TH MEU LCE CREATES ELIXIR OF LIFE

By Lance Cpl. Jacob Pruitt, 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit

August 24, 2017

PACIFIC OCEAN --

The 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit is deployed as a crises response and contingency force in the 7th Fleet’s area of operation and prepared for a multitude of mission capabilities, from full-scale raids to humanitarian assistance-disaster relief efforts.

The Logistics Combat Element is specifically trained in the latter and contains platoons, which provides logistical support in the form of capabilities such as medical assistance, general engineering, aviation landing support and water purification.

Water purification is vital to the 15th MEU, not just for humanitarian assistance, but for Marines deployed in underdeveloped and austere locations. Potable drinking water isn’t always available and dehydration is a serious detriment to mission accomplishment. For situations such as these, the 15th MEU employed the Lightweight Water Purification System, which is a portable water purifier used to turn fresh and salt water into potable drinking water for Marines to stay hydrated on ship and in the field. 

“We set up and started the LWPS so that we could cross train our other engineers and share some basic knowledge of operations,” said 1st Lieutenant Ryan Hedgcorth, the combat logistics detachment officer in charge, “In situations where my support water technicians, engineers and other elements of [the LCE] are spread too thin, this diversity in training allows us to be flexible and efficient when it comes to mission accomplishment.” 

Now that the 15th MEU is in the 7th Fleet area of operation the LWPS system is getting its first taste of the Pacific waters. Taking only a few hours from set up to purified, the water support technicians work together with combat engineers to assemble and disassemble the purifier.  

“We do this type of training to ensure, not only we know how to operate our own systems,” said Cpl. Kyle Ussery, a water support technician. “But setting up and running the LWPS also helps ensure all the different moving parts and individual systems run smoothly. Disassembly and reassembly is an opportunity to conduct maintenance if needed.”

The LWPS System is capable of purifying over six hundred gallons of potable drinking water an hour, and can purify fresh and salt water enabling the use of the purifier almost anywhere.

“Simply put everyone needs water,” said Ussery “The most satisfying part of doing what I do is knowing that without me and my team a lot of what everyone else does here on deployment would be impossible, and the people I provide for really appreciate us.”

With the LWPS the 15th MEU has the capability to provide not only for itself but also with an opportunity to help out those in need.

U.S. Marines train Ugandan Soldiers in water purification

Uganda LWPS

 

UGANDA 09.06.2017 Video by Staff Sgt. Rebekka Heite  U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Europe and Africa

  
U.S. Marine assigned to Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Africa logistics combat element are training Uganda People’s Defence Force soldiers in water purification techniques during an eight-week training mission at Camp Jinja, Uganda, from August to October 2017. SPMAGTF-CR-AF LCE is deployed to conduct limited crisis-response and theater-security operations in Europe and Africa. (U.S. Marine Corps video by Staff Sgt. Rebekka S. Heite/Released)