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Uganda Africa
Date(s): 18-27 May 2018

LWPS New Equipment Training in Uganda Africa during 21-25 May 2018.




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2010

Senior leaders visit Corps’ first experimental FOB 3/18/2010

 

Wednesday, February 03, 2010

New Water Purification System for GI's

1st Marine Logistic Group Public Affairs  Story by Lance Cpl. Khoa Pelczar

02.02.2010  MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – As Marines conduct combat operations overseas, they will need water to carry on the mission.

Hygiene equipment operators with 1st Marine Logistics Group trained and familiarized themselves with a new and improved water purification system here, Jan. 27.

"The purpose of this training is to introduce a brand new piece of equipment into the Marine Corps," said Gunnery Sgt. Jason J. Parrish, project officer for Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Va. "This Lightweight Water Purification System will be replacing the legacy system 3,000 Lightweight Military Tactical Water Purification System."

According to Parrish, 36, from Pittsboro, Ind., the old system can only purify
fresh water, as opposed to the new system, which can purify any kind of water.

"It met or exceeded all requirements that were given, it went above and beyond," said Parrish. "A two-man team can unpack, set up and have the system operating in 15 minutes."

All week long, Marines were able to work with this new water purification system as this model will be going to Afghanistan with deploying Marines.

"The concept is that since it's easy to be moved around, it can be set-up in the back of a Humvee and go on a [combat logistics patrol] with the Marines," said Parrish. "This way, Marines can push forward with the mission and [they] don't have to be waiting on supplies. It fills the capability gap that has been in the Marine Corps forever."

The system was designed by Primo L. Acernese, developer with the Terra Group Corporation.

"As a young engineer I worked in the desert, so I learned to appreciate the value of water," said Acernese, from Allentown, Pa., developer of the LWPS. "Because water is very important, I've been working on this project for 14 years. My goal was to develop a system that is simple to operate and easy to move around and maintain."

The new water purification system will improve deploying Marines movement ability in a combat logistics patrol and provide water for Marines at forward operating base, therefore it will help Marines accomplish their missions.

Posted by MsMarti - on Wednesday, February 03, 2010 at 22:30 in Afghanistan News


Sgt. Carlos I. Salazar, 21, from Houston, hygiene equipment operator of Combat Logistics 5, Combat Logistics Regiment 1, 1st Marine Logistics Group, tests a Lightweight Water Purification System at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Jan. 27. The new water purification system allows Marines to purify water on the go as it weighs one-fourth of the old system.

Lance Cpl. Jose R. Sebastian, 22, from Queens, N.Y., hygiene equipment operator with Combat Logistics Battalion 5, Combat Logistics Regiment 1, 1st Marine Logistics Group, tests a Lightweight Water Purification System at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Jan. 27. The new water purification system allows Marines to purify water on the go as it weighs one-fourth of the old system.

Cpl. Jason R. Garris-Obrien (left), 22, from Houston, Lance Cpl. Jose R. Sebastian (middle), 22, from Queens, N.Y., and Sgt. Carlos I. Salazar (right), 21, from Houston, hygiene equipment operators with 1st Marine Logistics Group, test a Lightweight Water Purification System at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Jan. 27. The new water purification system allows Marines to purify water on the go as it weighs one-fourth as much as the old system.


Senior leaders visit Corps’ first experimental FOB 

3/18/2010  By Cpl. Priscilla Sneden, Headquarters Marine Corps 

General James T. Conway, commandant of the Marine Corps, toured a technical demonstration where more than two dozen commercial vendors showcased the first Experimental Forward Operating Base March 12.

ExFOB is a four-phase experiment which tests methods to reduce the logistical needs of combat units in a deployed environment. Created by the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, its ecological and cost benefits are in line with Conway's objective to reduce expenditure and extend a unit's sustainability.

"The commandant has made it very clear that his thoughts are to decrease risk to Marines. In order to do that we have to come up with solutions that reduce our demand on water and power," said Brig. Gen. Robert F. Hedelund, the warfighting lab commanding general. "Hopefully, we can achieve this with some of the solutions offered during the ExFOB."

Reducing resupply needs will alleviate the amount of trucks on the road and Marines exposed to improvised explosive devices and other dangers.

"Energy conservation is important to the Marine Corps because it saves lives. We're losing Marines over water and fuel," said Gunnery Sgt. Jason Parrish, project officer, Marine Corps Systems Command. "If we could bridge that gap we can mitigate [the amount of personnel and vehicles] on the road."

The Corps is seeking energy efficient solutions that are user-friendly and rugged enough to sustain transportation and avoid any additional burdens on a deploying unit.

Phase one of the experiment simulated the energy and water demands of a Marine unit at forward operating bases similar to those in Afghanistan. The initial phase determined the baseline requirements of company-size and smaller FOBs.

Hedelund said the project is currently in phase two, evaluating existing commercial technologies to meet the Marines' needs and increasing power generation efficiency to sustain a small base.

Next, a unit preparing to deploy will use the renewable technology and energy-saving techniques learned in the initial phases.

"Phase three will be the end user evaluation. Equipment will be sent to Afghanistan to see how well it fares in a combat environment," Hedelund said.

The fourth and final phase will facilitate future science and technology efforts by gathering data on experimental systems.

Subject matter experts and Marines from the operational forces will evaluate and assess systems to determine which are beneficial to the Marine Corps.

"[The commandant] has applied a lot of energy to this. He is making sure [the assessment teams] stay focused with a sense of urgency to get this [technology] down range," Hedelund said.

Hedelund also said some of the items on display are currently being used in Afghanistan, while various "green" solutions are anticipated to reach the region this summer.

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va.-Vendors at the first Experimental  Forward Operating Base brief Gen. James T. Conway, commandant of the  Marine Corps, on possible energy efficient solutions as he tours the  technical demonstration March 12, 2010.  Created by the Marine Corps  Warfighting Laboratory, ExFOB is a four-phase experiment that tests  methods to reduce the logistical needs of combat units in a deployed  environment. The Corps is seeking energy efficient solutions that are  user-friendly and rugged enough to sustain transportation and avoid an  additional burden on a deploying unit. , <b>Cpl. Priscilla Sneden,  3/12/2010 5:23 AM</b>

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va.-Vendors at the first Experimental Forward Operating Base brief Gen. James T. Conway, commandant of the Marine Corps, on possible energy efficient solutions as he tours the technical demonstration March 12, 2010. Created by the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, ExFOB is a four-phase experiment that tests methods to reduce the logistical needs of combat units in a deployed environment. The Corps is seeking energy efficient solutions that are user-friendly and rugged enough to sustain transportation and avoid an additional burden on a deploying unit. , Cpl. Priscilla Sneden, 3/12/2010 5:23 AM