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News

Uganda Africa
Date(s): 18-27 May 2018

LWPS New Equipment Training in Uganda Africa during 21-25 May 2018.




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2013

Marines test water purification equipment, systems

Naval Mobile Construction Battalion NMCB 133 Participates in Water Pump Instruction Video

Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group

Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5

 

LWPS: Water, Water, Anywhere for the USMC

Nov 18, 2013 14:21 UTC by Defense Industry Daily staff

You can live for weeks without food. A week without water will leave you dead, especially if you’re exerting yourself in unfriendly conditions. More bad news: water is heavy to carry, which means it takes a lot of resources to transport. There are all kinds of very clever single-soldier solutions for purifying water, but bases and outposts will need options that can scale and produce a steady supply. The US Marines are looking for expeditionary solutions, and TerraGroup’s TECWAR will be selling them some.

Nov 18/13: TerraGroup Corp. in Allentown, PA receives a $49.9 million firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/ indefinite-quantity contract for their Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS). The initial $15 million delivery order (#0001) buys LWPS and enhanced pump modules using FY 2013 procurement finds, and delivery is expected to be complete by January 2015. This contract was competitively awarded via FBO.gov, with 3 offers received. US Marine Corps Systems Command in Quantico, VA manages this contract, on behalf of the USMC’s Product manager, expeditionary power systems and Program manager, combat support systems (M67854-14-D-5001).

The LWPS is a lightweight water purification system used to produce potable water from water sources such as rivers, lakes, wells, and oceans for Marines operating in austere environments. It includes generators, pumping, and reverse osmosis hyper-filtration for use by highly mobile teams in remote areas or emergency and temporary site. The entire system can load on a HMMWV utility variant.

LWPS flow rates are given as 2.5 Gal./ 9.5L per minute, or 150 US Gal./ 586L per hour. It can be operated and maintained by 1 operator, and general maintenance and repairs require no special tools as long as parts are present. System options include an Ocean Intake Structure System (OISS), Cold Weather Module (CWK), modules for Nuclear/ Biological/ Chemical contaminated environments; and an Increased Production Module (IPM) for really dirty sources.


 

Pfc. James E. Baker connects a lightweight water purification system hose at Kin Blue beach near Camp Hansen April 30. Baker and Griggs are water support technicians with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Henry J. Antenor)

Pfc. James E. Baker connects a lightweight water purification system hose at Kin Blue beach near Camp Hansen April 30. The purpose of the training exercise was to train new Marines and test the functionality of the water purification systems for future use within the Asia-Pacific region, according to Sgt. Anthony W. Griggs. Baker and Griggs are water support technicians with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Henry J. Antenor)

News: Marines test water purification equipment, systems

by: Lance Cpl. Henry J. Antenor
MCIPAC
published: May 06, 2013

KIN BLUE BEACH, Okinawa, Japan - Marines ran down the beach and entered the surf, taking their filtration system’s equipment with them. With the pull of a cord, the pump roared to life, drawing water through multiple layers of the filtration system, cleansing it until potable drinking water was produced.

Utilities Platoon with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172 executed water production operations on Kin Blue beach near Camp Hansen April 29 to May 3 in order to train new Marines and test the functionality of the water purification systems.

With an increased number of new Marines, it was important for the squadron to train the Marines in water purification operations, according to Staff Sgt. Pete Leyva III, an electrician with MWSS-172, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force.

“The training helps Marines meet their requirements, so they can go to future exercises and operations, and it teaches them what it takes to purify water in a field environment,” said Leyva.

MWSS-172 participates in a variety of exercises in the Asia-Pacific region where the squadron provides potable water for humanitarian assistance and disaster relief and other uses such as laundry and showers, according to Chief Warrant Officer Victor E. Velasquez, a utilities officer with MWSS-172.

“The purpose of MWSS-172 is to support MAG-36 and 1st MAW wherever we are needed, such as Exercise Balikatan or Operation Tomodachi,” said Velasquez. “Both the lightweight water purification system and tactical water purification system help us meet that requirement.”

The process of purifying water is a long, complicated task simplified with the specialized equipment, according to Velasquez.

Marines begin by inserting strainers into the surf. The strainers are attached to pumps that pull water from the ocean and move it through a series of filtration systems making the water potable.

“Situations that require this training include humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations, where the area we are assigned lacks water to drink,” said Sgt. Anthony W. Griggs, a water support technician with the squadron. “If there is a case where the water is contaminated, we have biological decontamination systems that come with the TWPS and LWPS to purify the water, so it is drinkable.”

Marines encountered some difficulties while training, such as changes in the tide, but the Marines overcame the issues and continued training.

“Each field exercise is different, forcing us to adapt, but it makes us better prepared the next time we train, and I am thankful for my unit to have that ability,” said Lance Cpl. Cecilia M. Mavrommatis, a water support technician with the squadron.

Okinawa-Hansen

Lance Cpl. Cecilia M. Mavrommatis, left, and Venicio S. Pedro drive a water table oceanic intake system strainer into the surf at Kin Blue beach near Camp Hansen April 30. Marine Wing Support Squadron 172 participates in a variety of exercises in the Asia-Pacific region where the squadron provides potable water for consumption and other everyday uses such as laundry and showers. Mavrommatis is a water support technician and Pedro is a refrigeration and air conditioning technician. Both are with MWSS-172, Marine Aircraft Group 36, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Henry J. Antenor)


NMCB 133 Participates in Water Pump Instruction Video

By Lt. j.g. Jason Spotts

GULFPORT, Miss. - Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133’s Air Detachment participated in the production of an instructional training video for the Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) June 10.

The film, recorded on a local Gulfport beach, featured Utilitiesman 3rd Class Nathan Gaffney, Utilitiesman 3rd Class Brandon Huot and Utilitiesman Constructionman Matthew Kicinski deploying the pump and intake system into the Gulf of Mexico while two cameramen and Naval Construction Training Center (NCTC) Gulfport Utilities Instructor Darcy Mogler directed the evolution.

The training video will be part of the new curriculum for the Utilitiesman (UT) C1 Advanced course, Water Treatment, which was piloted from January to April. The training video will also be available under the UT Portal on Navy Knowledge Online (NKO) for personnel who wish to refresh themselves, or for commands to conduct Unit Driven Training (UDT).

The portion of the video shot June 10 focuses on the deployment of the pump and intake system, which then sends raw water to the filtration and chlorination systems and on to a storage bladder.

While the training video is just a small part of a much larger, ongoing Seabee training reset, the efforts of the three UTs will complement course instruction, providing visual aids to enhance course material and will facilitate more efficient training, permitting personnel to see the process step-by-step.

NMCB 133 is currently in a home-port training cycle in preparation for their next deployment.

Utilitiesman 3rd Class Nathan Gaffney from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 133 starts the pump for a Lightweight Water Purification System during the production of a training video. The video will be used in an advanced water treatment course offered to Navy Seabees at the Naval Construction Training Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g Jason Spotts/Released)

Utilitiesman Constructionman Matthew Kicinski from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 133 prepares to insert an intake strainer into the Gulf of Mexico during the production of a training video. The video will be used in an advanced water treatment course offered to Navy Seabees at the Naval Construction Training Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g Jason Spotts/Released)

Utilitiesman 3rd Class Brandon Huot from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB)133 pours water into a priming tube of a Lightweight Water Purification System pump during the production of a training video. The video will be used in an advanced water treatment course offered to Navy Seabees at the Naval Construction Training Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g Jason Spotts/Released)


Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group

(NAVELSG) July 23, 2013 LWPS Training

Construction Mechanic 3rd Class Lawrence Knight, from Yorktown, Va., attached to Navy Cargo Handling Battalion (NCHB 1), checks for zero pressure during back flushing operations on the Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) at Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group (NAVELSG) July 23. LWPS is a reverse osmosis modular unit that is equipped for small-scale water purification in any field condition. NAVELSG provides expeditionary logistics capability for the Navy and joint service customers. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward Kessler/Released)

Daniel Hillenbrand, from Allentown, Pa., with the TerraGroup Corporation, instructs Sailors from Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group (NAVELSG) on the Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) July 23. LWPS is a reverse osmosis modular unit that is equipped for small-scale water purification in any field condition. NAVELSG provides expeditionary logistics capability for the Navy and joint service customers. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward Kessler/Released)

Utilitiesman 3rd Class Matthew Graeve, from Lincoln, Neb., attached to Explosive Ordnance Disposal - Expeditionary Support Unit 2 (EOD-ESU 2), checks the pressure gage during back flushing operations on the Lightweight Water Purification System (LPWS) at Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group (NAVELSG) July 23. LWPS is a reverse osmosis modular unit that is equipped for small-scale water purification in any field condition. NAVELSG provides expeditionary logistics capability for the Navy and joint service customers. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward Kessler/Released)

Equipment Operator 1st Class John Lufholm (left), from Newport News, Va., assigned to Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group (NAVELSG), and Daniel Hillenbrand (right), from Allentown, Pa., with the Terragroup Corporation, review back flushing procedures on the Lightweight Water Purification System (LPWS) NAVELSG July 23. LWPS is a reverse osmosis modular unit that is equipped for small scale, water purification in any field condition. NAVELSG provides expeditionary logistics capability for the Navy and joint service customers. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward Kessler/Released)

Daniel Hillenbrand, from Allentown, Pa., with the Terragroup Corporation, instructs sailors from Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group (NAVELSG) on the Lightweight Water Purification System (LWPS) July 23. LWPS is a reverse osmosis modular unit that is equipped for small-scale water purification in any field condition. NAVELSG provides expeditionary logistics capability for the Navy and joint service customers. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Edward Kessler/Released)


Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5

Hometown: Port Hueneme, Calif., CA, US

Builder Constructionman Kelvin Chen, from Loveland, Colo., directs Seabees where to place a part of the lightweight water purification system while learning how to assemble the system and how it operates. Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5 conducted block training evolutions to increase the combat proficiency of the Seabees assigned to the command and to test the equipment used during field operations. NMCB 5 is currently supporting Navy and joint forces throughout the U.S. Pacific Command. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John P. Curtis/Released)